What Makes America America Essay

What Makes America America Essay-27
Georgia is known as “The Peach State” or “Empire State of the South.” 5 – Connecticut – January 9, 1788 Fifth of the thirteen original states to ratify the U. Constitution, Connecticut was admitted to the United States January 9, 1788.

Georgia is known as “The Peach State” or “Empire State of the South.” 5 – Connecticut – January 9, 1788 Fifth of the thirteen original states to ratify the U. Constitution, Connecticut was admitted to the United States January 9, 1788.The Connecticut State Constitution currently in use was adopted in 1965, and is known as “The Constitution State.” 6 – Massachusetts – February 6, 1788 “The Bay State,” Massachusetts, is sixth of the thirteen original states to ratify the U. Constitution and thus be admitted to the Union of the United States. The current Maryland State Constitution in use was adopted in 1867.

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The 2019 Constituting America 90 Day Study on State and Local Government expounds upon the gravity of that which makes America thrive due to strict limits of its federal governing powers, directing attention to the true holders of America’s power, her people, and consent of the governed that results in a flourishing United States.

Condensed Table of Contents Detailed Table of Contents With Links to Essays as They Are Published Introduction – History and constitutional background of American Founders’ and Framers’ views on local governments for a strong, free, prosperous United States Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution – Purpose for limited federal powers and what the amendment means for state and local government; Bill of Rights as “a Line drawn as clearly as may be between the federal Powers vested in Congress and the distinct Sovereignty of the several States upon which the private and personal Rights of the Citizens depend.” – Samuel Adams Federalist 45 on Connection of the States to the Federal Level – “…each of the principal branches of the federal government will owe its existence more or less to the favor of the State governments, and must consequently feel a dependence, which is much more likely to beget a disposition too obsequious than too overbearing towards them.” – James Madison 1 – Delaware – December 7, 1787 As the Constitutional Convention came to a close in Philadelphia, America’s founding representatives signed the United States Constitution on September 17, 1787.

Minnesota is known as “The North Star State.” 33 – Oregon – February 14, 1859 Joining the Union February 14, 1859 by ratifying the U. Constitution, Oregon became the thirty-third state. Currently in use is the Oregon State Constitution ratified in 1857, and adopted in 1859 once Oregon became a state Guest Essayist: Brad Bergford, Chief Executive Officer, Colorado Family Action and Colorado Family Action Foundation 34 – Kansas – January 29, 1861 “The Sunflower State,” as Kansas is known, ratified the U. Constitution January 29, 1861 as the thirty-fourth admitted to the United States. The Nebraska State Constitution in use today was adopted in 1875.

Prior to the start of the Civil War and eight states having just seceded, Kansas was admitted as a free state; Bleeding Kansas; The Kansas State Constitution currently in use was adopted in 1861 35 – West Virginia – June 20, 1863 Admitted June 20, 1863 by ratifying the U. Constitution, West Virginia became the thirty-fifth state. “The Silver State,” as it is known, currently uses the Nevada State Constitution adopted in 1864 37 – Nebraska – March 1, 1867 March 1, 1867 ushered in the thirty-seventh state, Nebraska, to ratify the U. Nebraska is known as “The Cornhusker State.” Bill of Rights, State and Local Government – How the Bill of Rights was aimed at the federal government because states had their own bills of rights; Barron v.

The current South Carolina State Constitution was adopted in 1896. New Hampshire was the ninth and final state needed to accomplish this official ratification which ended government under the Articles of Confederation 10 – Virginia – June 25, 1788 “Old Dominion” as Virginia is known, was tenth of the thirteen original states to ratify the U. Constitution, admitting it to the Union June 25, 1788.

South Carolina is known as “The Palmetto State.” 9 – New Hampshire – June 21, 1788 Known as “The Granite State,” New Hampshire was ninth of the thirteen original states to ratify the U. Constitution, admitting it to the Union June 21, 1788. Constitution says nine states would be sufficient to ratify and officially make the U. The Virginia State Constitution in current use was adopted in 1971; the Virginia Constitution of 1776 compared to the MA Constitution of 1780 11 – New York – July 26, 1788 Eleventh of the thirteen original states to ratify the U. Constitution, New York was admitted to the Union July 26, 1788 and is known as “The Empire State.” The current New York State Constitution was adopted in 1895 12 – North Carolina – November 21, 1789 Twelfth of the thirteen original states to ratify the U. Constitution, North Carolina, “The Tar Heel State,” was admitted to the United States November 21, 1789.

The Washington State Constitution was adopted in 1889 and is the version in use today Modern State and the Capacity for Political Liberty of Citizens to Participate in Civil Governance –Debate on ‘overseas empire’ and its implications for federalism as structured within the U. Constitution 43 – Idaho – July 3, 1890 Known as “The Gem State,” Idaho ratified the U. Constitution July 3, 1890 admitting the forty-third state to the Union. Known as “The Equality State,” it currently uses the Wyoming State Constitution adopted in 1889 45 – Utah – January 4, 1896 Utah makes the forty-fifth state to ratify the U. Constitution, admitting it to the Union January 4, 1896. The New Mexico State Constitution used today is the version adopted on the same day as its statehood, January 6, 1912. The Arizona State Constitution in use today was adopted in 1912 A Growing United States to World War I (1914-1918), the Great Depression and New Deal to the Gulf War (1990-1991) 49 – Alaska – January 3, 1959 Known as “The Last Frontier,” Alaska was the forty-ninth to ratify the U. The federal district is named for Christopher Columbus, and officially the nation’s capital became the District of Columbia on February 21, 1871; the Twenty-Third Amendment to the United States Constitution provides D. ability to participate in the Electoral College Statewide Leadership and Representation Form of Government – Purpose and impact of Article IV, Section 4 of the U. Constitution in that “The United States Shall guarantees to every state in the Union a Republican Form of Government” – How the republican (representative) styles such as Commission Form, County Administrator, Elected Executive, City-County Consolidation, Constitutional Row Offices or Home Rule Authority ensures power remains in the hands of each American, preventing a monarchy or aristocracy in each state and local government State Legislatures – History and purpose of state legislatures, and in relation to Congress regarding legislative sessions Guest Essayist: Nandi Randolph, Policy Analyst, Delaware Family Policy Council State Senators – Role and purpose, how a state senate (upper chamber) is smaller than a state house of representatives (lower chamber), yet each senator represents more people than the representatives Guest Essayist: Mary Salamon, Author, The Government and Its People; Former Publisher, Marysville Tulalip Life Magazine; Former Washington State Leader, Governors Prayer Team State Representatives – Role and purpose of state representatives Guest Essayist: Mary Salamon, Author, The Government and Its People; Former Publisher, Marysville Tulalip Life Magazine; Former Washington State Leader, Governors Prayer Team Speaker of the State House of Representatives – How chosen in most states, speaker purpose and roles Guest Essayist: Mary Salamon, Author, The Government and Its People; Former Publisher, Marysville Tulalip Life Magazine; Former Washington State Leader, Governors Prayer Team Attorney General – Role and purpose for attorneys general of the states; history, and as compared to the Attorney General of the United States County and City Leadership, and Representation “All Politics is Local” – The view that “all politics is local” and why; purpose for the amount of local governments that exist such as counties, municipalities, towns and townships, special districts and school districts within the United States; effects of sparse versus dense geographic areas represented, urban versus rural for effective, constitutional representation County Leadership – Elected and appointed county roles; purpose and impact of county boards, county executives, county managers, assessor, treasurer, supervisor, commissioners; history and development of counties and their governance, functions of the county seat; how some are airport hubs, for example, and maintain other significant functions different from city government; relationship to state level leadership for local management of statewide issues City Leadership – Elected and appointed city roles; purpose of city council and impact of local city councils, city managers, administrators and other municipal, legislative bodies; role of a mayor, and significance in how states differ regarding the mayoral role as compared to other elected seats; how in some states a city mayor may carry significant power as compared to that of the governor; examples such as Mayors Robert Moses or Rudy Giuliani of New York City and how each, in his service, affected not only the city but the entire state Home Rule or Dillon Rule?

The Idaho State Constitution currently use today was adopted on the same day as the state’s admission to the Union, July 3, 1890 44 – Wyoming – July 10, 1890 July 10, 1890 marks the admission of Wyoming as the forty-fourth state to ratify the U. Utah became known as “The Beehive State” and currently uses the Utah State Constitution adopted in 1896 46 – Oklahoma – November 16, 1907 Forty-sixth to ratify the U. Constitution was “The Sooner State,” Oklahoma, thus admitting it to the United States. & Libby Blankenship Chair in the History of Liberty; Director of the Center for the History of Liberty, The University of Oklahoma 47 – New Mexico – January 6, 1912 Admitted to the United States January 6, 1912, New Mexico became the forty-seventh state to ratify the U. New Mexico is known as “The Enchanted State.” 48 – Arizona – February 14, 1912 “The Grand Canyon State” of Arizona became the forty-eighth and last of the contiguous states to enter the Union, ratifying the U. – Meaning, purpose and impact of “Home Rule” or “Dillon Rule” authority, how each works for local government in comparison to state; initiative and referendum, delegation and management to make and implement local policy decisions as made by voters and local leadership State Supreme Courts – How state supreme courts work in relation to the United States Supreme Court; how America’s Founders intended the nation’s judiciary would serve as lower than, and not superior to, the legislative branch in order only to function as interpreter and not maker of law; Alexander Hamilton in Federalist 78, “The interpretation of the laws is the proper and peculiar province of the courts.” Judicial Finality and Effects on State and Local Government – Reconsidering Judicial Finality, an essay by Louis Fisher from his book on Reconsidering Judicial Finality and the Supreme Court, with an emphasis on state and local effects Funding State and Local Government Taxation and the States – Concerns that the Constitution did not explicitly restrain elected officials by specific limitations on the taxing power, then they will use the taxation power to extend the reach of federal government Funding States and Cities: How Dollars Work – Connection to Congress regarding funding of states and municipalities; how taxes, which is how governments have money, work for the United States as a whole and individual states down to the most local levels; what and how from federal, to state, to county, to city gets funded Funding States and Cities: The Arguments – Why America’s founders wanted limited government; what this means in relation to the ongoing arguments presented by America’s voters and their elected representatives for and against raising and lowering taxes Elections: State, County and City Apportionment – Population and how it works to affect development of not only congressional representation, but also city, county and state governing bodies, and districts The Federal Government’s “Duty to Dispose” of Public Lands – When states became states, and the federal government’s failure to make good on the agreement Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President, Institute for Liberty; Host, The Langer Cast, RELMNetwork.com; Constituting America Fellow Land and the States – How the massive ownership of federal lands in western states negatively impacts state and local governance Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President, Institute for Liberty; Host, The Langer Cast, RELMNetwork.com; Constituting America Fellow Would the United States Exist Without Borders?

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