Score 6 Essay

Score 6 Essay-48
B Naturally, for each passage you're going to want to play to its particular strengths—if there are a lot of facts/statistics, make sure to discuss that; if it dwells more on personal anecdotes/appeals to emotion, discuss those.

People tend to put more faith in experiences if they can personally connect with the experiences (even though that doesn't actually affect how likely or not a statement is to be true).

In the example above, rather than discussing the statistics that support the creation of wildlife refuges, Jimmy Carter instead uses an anecdote about experiencing the wonder of nature to illustrate the same point—probably more effectively.

Isn’t the point of the essay that you’re supposed to be using information from the passage in your answer, which you don’t know about ahead of time? While the specifics of each example will obviously change, depending on the passage, the types of examples you choose to discuss (and the way you explain each example builds the author’s argument) can be defined, and thus prepared for, ahead of time.

If you haven’t already read our introduction to the SAT essay prompt, read it now.

Here's another example from "Let There Be Dark": Facts and statistics are persuasive argument building techniques because the author isn't just making up reasons for why his/her argument could possibly be true—there's actually something (data, research, other events/information) that backs up the author's claim.

In the case of the examples above, Bogard presents specific data about issues with light pollution (8 in 10 children won't be able to see the Milky Way, light in the sky increases 6% annually) to back up his statements that light pollution is real, then goes on to present further information that indicates light pollution is a problem (working the night shift puts humans at risk for cancer).By inviting the reader to experience vicariously the majesty of witnessing the migration of the Porcupine caribou, Carter activates the reader's empathy towards wildlife preservation and so makes it more likely that the reader will agree with him that wildlife refuges are important.All authors use reasoning to some extent, but it’s not always a major part of how the author builds her/his argument.This flexibility should prove to you how effective pre-planned examples are.So, without further ado, onto our list of multipurpose support for any SAT Essay prompt.Here are a couple of examples of statistics from an official SAT essay prompt, "Let There Be Dark" by Paul Bogard: Factual evidence can also be in the form of non-numerical information.Often, you'll see facts presented with references to the research study, survey, expert, or other source from which they're drawn.The dramatic procession of the Porcupine caribou herd was a once-in-a-lifetime wildlife spectacle.We understand firsthand why some have described this special birthplace as “America’s Serengeti.” Even though anecdotes aren't statistics or facts, they can be powerful because it’s more relatable/interesting to the reader to read an anecdote than to be presented with dry, boring facts.When an author discusses own personal experience or personal experience of someone they know or have heard of, that's anecdotal evidence.Here's an example of (part of) an anecdote from an official SAT essay prompt that was adapted from a foreword by former U. President Jimmy Carter: One of the most unforgettable and humbling experiences of our lives occurred on the coastal plain.

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